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Cabin Fever (2002)

Director:
Eli Roth
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Horror
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Cabin Fever
RUNNING TIME
93 minutes
Producer:
Eli Roth
Evan Astrowsky
Sam Froelich
Lauren Moews
Jeff Hoffman
Screenwriter:
Eli Roth
Randy Pearlstein


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Paul Rider Strong
Bert James DeBello
Karen Jordan Ladd
Marcy Cerina Vincent
Jeff Joey Kern
Deputy Winston Olsen Guiseppe Andrews
Justin Eli Roth

 

Review

Cabin Fever, the debut of now renowned horror filmmaker Eli Roth (Hostel), opens as the most conventional of horror movies: a bunch of teenagers retreat to the woods to spend a week in a cabin. This and similar formulas were used frequently in the slasher movies of the 1970s and in the resurgence of this subgenre in the 2000s. And Roth even adds a Deliverance-ish scene at a local convencience store which turns out to be more clever than what it seems at first.

This all may seem a bit too familiar to interest, but it gradually becomes clear that Cabin Fever is a little different. Firstly, the dialogue and the characters' interaction is a little more humanlike and justifiable than in your standard horror movie. And secondly, as the infectious flesh-eating virus starts terrorizing these teenagers, Roth exhibits a fair share of flair and creativity in how he lets the plot unfold and the characters fend for themselves. The film shifts with tongue-in-cheek from standardized horror plotting to bits and pieces of inventive development, and through it all, Roth maintains a fine level of suspense, genre considered. Cabin Fever is disgusting and attractive in equal doses and in a non-offensive way. And the ending is full of confidence and panache, its a wrap-up which Roth clearly knows to be an ace up his sleeve.

 

Copyright 5.5.2011 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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