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Final Destination (2000)

Director:
James Wong
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Thriller
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Final Destination
RUNNING TIME
98 minutes
Producer:
Glen Morgan
Craig Perry
Warren Zide
Screenwriter:
Glen Morgan
James Wong
Jeffrey Reddick


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Alex Browning Devon Sawa
Clear Rivers Ali Larter
Carter Horton Kerr Smith
William Bludworth Tony Todd
Ms. Valerie Lewton Kristen Cooke
Billy Hitchcock Seann William Scott

 

Review

Most things about James Wong's Final Destination is most unfortunate. This is a film spoiled by a lack of shrewdness and flair in the writing process. There are interesting elements in here, but every time you might think the film is heading for something good, it is spoiled by surprisingly bad choices.

The premise explores the idea of fate and predetermination, proposing that death is never accidental, but rather part of a larger plan or design. This is a concept which the human race have been fascinated by for centuries, and early on in Final Destination, it seems that Wong and co. might have something with which to fuel this fascination. The movie's first part, with Sawa's vision inside the plane, is harrowing and thoughtprovoking, but we're quickly put off by the introduction of a subplot that is mostly concerned with suspicion and animosity towards the Sawa-character. An angle kept through most of the film, and that seems both out of place and unmotivated considering the fact that this kid has saved a lot of people's lives. It reduces many of the supporting roles to caricatures that you'd might think had disappeared with the Rambo movies. And it doesn't help the case that the acting is nowhere near good enough to justify these strange (to say the least) interpersonal relations.

As Final Destination approaches its final destination, it becomes increasingly more apparent that, although Alex's visions continue, the filmmaker's visions dry out. The film is reduced to a cliched horror flick which effectively removes the potential existential discussions that the start of the film suggested. In Wong's conclusion, the premise of death is not only decided by fate, but more (or less) impressively descends on us as a Scream-type serial killer. I predict that most viewers will fairly quickly reject Final Destination, and as the ending approaches, we're closing in on ridicule.

Copyright 6.8.2007 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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