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Marnie (1964)

Director:
Alfred Hitchcock
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Thriller
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Marnie
RUNNING TIME
130 minutes
Producer:
Alfred Hitchcock
Screenwriter:
Jay Presson Allen


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Marnie Edgar Tippi Hedren
Mark Rutland Sean Connery
Sidney Strutt Martin Gabel
Bernice Edgar Louise Latham
Lil Mainwaring Diane Baker
Mr. Rutland Alan Napier
Cousin Bob Bob Sweeney
Susan Clabon Mariette Hartley
The Sailor Bruce Dern

 

Review

* This review may contain spoilers. *

If a beautiful woman isn't willing to have sex with Sean Connery, she must have a traumatic past. That is essentially Alfred Hitchcock's claim with the rich, but slightly flawed psychological thriller Marnie. And who's to say he wasn't right. God knows Connery has had his fair share of women. Seeing Marnie in retrospect, the boldness in tackling its subject matters counts for more than the period-characteristic fallacies detract. For instance, the picture is heavily coloured by the position of Freudian ideas during the mid 20th century; Marnie's entire behaviour is explained with the Austrian neurologist's teachings. But even if these teachings come off a little slanted today, there's nothing simplified or banal with Hitchcock's handling of these touchy subject matters. Almost no other filmmakers went into these dark waters at the time, and as he proved with Vertigo and Psycho (among others), Hitchcock had a real knack for conveying the forces at work in the human psyche. Connery and Hedren, who plays the title character with conviction, work great off of each other. And Hitch also displays his astute stylistic sense here; Marnie following in the footsteps of the aforementioned Vertigo stylistically.

Copyright 4.10.2014 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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