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Scent of a Woman (1992)

Director:
Martin Brest
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Drama
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Duften av kvinne

RUNNING TIME
156 minutes

Producer:
Martin Brest
Screenwriter (based on "Il buio e il miele" by Giovanni Arpino):
Bo Goldman


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Lieutenant Colonel Frank Slade Al Pacino ˝
Charlie Simms Chris O'Donnell
Mr. Trask James Rebhorn ˝
Donna Gabrielle Anwar
George Willis, Jr. Philip Seymour Hoffman
Manny Gene Canfield
William "W.R." Slade Richard Venture
Randy Slade Bradley Whitford
Mrs. Hunsaker June Squibb
Christine Downes Frances Conroy

 

Review

Directed/produced by Martin Brest and penned by Bo Goldman (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Melvin and Howard), Scent of a Woman is written and constructed to manipulate you utilizing a flashy Al Pacino at the top of his game. This is a showy film, but showiness can be effective and fun when coupled with this level of showmanship. Pacino’s character Frank Slade is a retired high-ranking military officer whose loss of sight from an accident has left him bitter, disillusioned and suicidal. He hires young prep school student Charlie Simms (Chris O’Donnell) as his assistant for an extravagant trip to New York, where they get the chance to deconstruct each other’s highly disparate problems. Youthful openness meets worldly indifference, and Brest is romantic enough to believe that his two main characters can better each other. In a close to career-best performance, Al Pacino isn’t all about mimickry, even though his character at times seems to be. There’s a lot more beneath Frank Slade’s surface; a well of contradicting emotions and bottled-up frustration that seeps up in small portions when Charlie’s sensitivity and obvious loyality eventually gets under Frank’s skin. It all culminates in an unabashed climax which we’ve been longing for, starving for through two-and-a-half hours of expertly dictated chagrin.

Copyright © 29.12.2019 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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