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Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

Director:
Alfred Hitchcock
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Thriller
NORWEGIAN TITLE
I tvilens skygge
RUNNING TIME
108 minutes
Producer:
Jack H. Skirball
Screenwriter (based on a story by Gordon McDonnell):
Thornton Wilder
Sally Benson
Alma Reville


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Young Charlie Teresa Wright
Uncle Charlie Joseph Cotten
Jack Graham Macdonald Carey
Joseph Newton Henry Travers
Emma Newton Patricia Collinge
Herbie Hawkins Hume Cronyn
Ann Newton Edna May Wonacott
Fred Saunders Wallace Ford
Station Master Irving Bacon

 

Review

Shadow of a Doubt comes sneaking up on you, albeit not from behind. Allegedly considered by Hitch as his best film, it has that element of uncontrollable disturbance placed into the neatest and most orderly surroundings. Early on, the Wright/Cotten relationship is amazingly vibrant and suggestive, it makes the film more layered than it ultimately acts upon. Unfortunately, the censors of the time would never have allowed a film to go down that road, but the incestuous suggestions are there for the viewer to interpret. Hitchcock discusses the presence of a potential serial killer in the midst of prosperous, untroubled smalltown America, and his contrastive analysis is perceptive and thoughtprovoking. The film is a powerful and nuanced character study with impressive human insight, especially through the two Charlies. And Joseph Cotten's character has a delicate duality to him that was quite pioneering in Hollywood at the time. Ultimately, Shadow of a Doubt isn't as seductive or absorbing as Hitchcock's very best films, but it has room for some delicate humour as well, particularly through a magnificent Hume Cronyn who easily steals this, his first film.

Copyright 30.4.2007 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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