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Spellbound (1945)

Director:
Alfred Hitchcock
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Mystery/Thriller
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Trollbundet
RUNNING TIME
111 minutes
Producer:
David O. Selznick
Screenwriter:
Angus MacPhail
Ben Hecht


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Dr. Constance Petersen Ingrid Bergman
Dr. Anthony Edwardes / John Ballantyne Gregory Peck
Dr. Alex Brulov Michael Chekhov
Dr. Murchison Leo G. Carroll
Mary Carmichael Rhonda Fleming
Dr. Fleurot John Emery
Dr. Graff Steven Geray
Dr. Hanish Paul Harvey

 

Review

Of Hitchcock's many meanderings into the human psyche, this "Freudian slip" of his has arguably stood the test of time least well despite, or perhaps because, it was also the most outright. The mystery is Gregory Peck's brain, and the detective is the enamoured Ingrid Bergman. She's surrounded by condescending wiseacres telling her all the mistakes she's making because of her infatuation and sex. It's all very didactic. Hitchcock tries to help things along by treating us to a number of creative shots which are meant to intensify the non-stop psycho-babble which unfortunately is what most of the script comes off as today. Peck and Bergman do their best to keep on top and make their relationship credible, which of course it isn't (except for in real-life, as it were), but the real problem here is that the film relies too heavily on psychological theories and concepts which have long since been more or less debunked. What remains when viewed today are the film's interest of curiosity along with a handful of unintended amusing scenes, such as the hilarious skiing scene towards the end.

Copyright 24.10.2016 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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