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The Way, Way Back (2013)

Director:
Nat Faxon
Jim Rash
COUNTRY
United States
Genre
Comedy/Drama
NORWEGIAN TITLE
USA

RUNNING TIME
103 minutes

Producer:
Kevin J. Walsh
Screenwriter:
Nat Faxon
Jim Rash


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Duncan Liam James
Trent Ramsey Steve Carell
Pam Toni Collette
Owen Sam Rockwell
Betty Thompson Allison Janney
Susanna Thompson AnnaSophia Robb
Caitlin Maya Rudolph
Kip Rob Corddry
Joan Amanda Peet
Lewis Jim Rash
Roddy Nat Faxon -
Kyle Robert Capron -
Lyle Ballou Noah Hathaway -
Peter Thompson River Alexander -
Steph Ramsey Zoe Levin -

 

Review

A fun opening sets the tone for this fine little coming-of-age movie from filmmaking duo Nat Faxon and Jim Rash (who both appear in comic relief parts). As we arrive in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for a summer vacation together with a handful of middle-aged couples and singles + their respective "yours, mine and ours", it soon becomes clear that there will be a lot of attention given to everyone except awkward 14-year-old Duncan (Liam James). His new stepdad (Steve Carell) belittles him, his stepsister (Zoe Levin) ignores him, and his mother (Toni Collette) is overwhelmed by it all. There's also another couple (Rob Cordry and Amanda Peet) as well as a risque, perpetually tipsy neighbour (Allison Janney) and her two children. This semi-chaotioc set-up of several disconcerting, selv-involved couples and parents makes the first part of The Way, Way Back feel like something Alan Alda could have written and directed in the 1980s. But after having settled a little, the film's focus shifts entirely to Duncan and his escapades biking around town, where he gets acquainted with manboy Sam Rockwell, who runs a local water park. It's this friendship which becomes the heart of The Way, Way Back and makes it stand out as a coming-of-age story for the ages. The Rockwell character's eccentricity and confident immaturity gives Duncan the courage to become self-assured and break free from the bonds of the other disillusioned grown-ups around him. Faxon/Rash's script has got novelty, flair and perception. Brilliant performances from Rockwell and Allison Janney complement Liam James' sensitive Lucas-ish Duncan.

Copyright 23.08.2020 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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