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Cool Hand Luke (1967)

Director:
Stuart Rosenberg
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Drama
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Rebell i lenker
RUNNING TIME
126 minutes
Producer:
Gordon Caroll
Screenwriter:
Donn Pearce
Frank Pierson


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Lucas "Luke" Jackson Paul Newman
Dragline George Kennedy
The Captain Strother Martin
Luke's mother, Arletta Jo Van Fleet
"Lucille" Joy Harmon
Boss Godfrey Morgan Woodward
Boss Shorty Robert Donner
Carr Clifton James
Society Red J.D. Cannon
Koko Lou Antonio
Loudmouth Steve Robert Drivas
Rabbitt Marc Cavell
Blind Dick Richard Davalos
Babalugats Dennis Hopper
Gambler Wayne Rogers
Tramp Harry Dean Stanton
Dog Boy Anthony Zerbe
Fixer Joe Don Baker

 

Review

Stuart Rosenberg directed this ostensibly dark and realistic drama about an irresponsible drifter down on his luck who ends up in a Florida prison camp where he encounters both camaraderie with his peers and brutal oppression from his captors. The film is wonderfully staged and shot, with lots of dusty environments and sweaty bodies, which makes you feel the heat and hardships these guys experience (even if the inmates' daily life is more reminiscent of boot camp than prison). And like all good prison movies, Cool Hand Luke thrives on the closeness and bond between the inmates, some of whom we'd like to get to know even better (Stanton's character for instance). The script is strong, but has a somewhat too pronounced mission; it has a rebellious anti-establishment tone running through it, which is fair enough seen in light of the US' involvement in the Vietnam War at the time of production, but which also makes the film and particularly the title character come off as a bit stagey and overly symbolic at times. Paul Newman does his best in the lead, but the character doesn't seem like a real person as much as a figurehead - arguably both for the filmmakers and the other prisoners. He represents what they want to see in themselves: courage to oppose the system and a seemingly ubreakable spirit. But we never really get to know him and his disposition. The only one who really seems to get him is the George Kennedy character, but their relationship is largely fruitless, because Kennedy's performance is way over the top alongside Newman's reserved acting.

Copyright 20.1.2014 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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