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Hud (1963)

Director:
Martin Ritt
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Drama
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Hud
RUNNING TIME
112 minutes
Producer:
Irving Ravetch
Martin Ritt
Screenwriter (based on the novel "Horseman, Pass By" by Larry McMurtry):
Irving Ravetch
Harriet Frank Jr.


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Hud Bannon Paul Newman
Homer Bannon Melvyn Douglas
Lonnie Bannon Brandon deWilde
Alma Brown Patricia Neal

 

Review

Old-fashioned rural values and stoisism clash with consumerism and the recklessness of youth in this brilliant study of characters and a new social order. Melvin Douglas and Paul Newman play the father and son who represent this clash, and Newman's younger brother, played by the unusually talented Brandon deWilde, is the one caught in the middle simultaneously drawn to Newman's narcisissm and to his father's dignity and firmness of principle. The film is based on Larry McMurtry's novel "Horseman, Pass By" (his debut, incidentally), and what a remarkable feat his social comment here is. Without the benefit of temporal distance, McMurtry illustrates the state of American agriculture and the cowboys' new position in modern society better than anyone has done before or since. And director Martin Ritt transfers McMurtry's observations brilliantly to the big screen, well helped by a perceptive script by Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank Jr. and commanding performances by the three leads as well as a steaming Patricia Neal. One of the best films of its kind and of its time. McMurtry followed-up impressively with The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment and Lonesome Dove over the next thirty years.

Copyright 15.01.2015 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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