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The Other Side of the Wind (2018)

Director:
Orson Welles

COUNTRY
USA/Iran/France

Genre
Drama

NORWEGIAN TITLE
-

RUNNING TIME
122 minutes

Producer:
Frank Marshall
Filip Jan Rymsza

Screenwriter:
Orson Welles
Oja Kodar


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
J.J. "Jake" Hannaford John Huston

The Actress

Oja Kodar
Brooks Otterlake

Peter Bogdanovich

Juliette Rich Susan Strasberg -
Billy Boyle Norman Foster -
John Dale Bob Random -
Zarah Valeska Lilli Palmer -
Pat Mullins Edmond O'Brien -
Maggie Noonan Mercedes McCambridge -
Matt Zimmer Cameron Mitchell -
Matt Costello Paul Stewart -
Jack Simon Gregory Sierra -
The Baron Tonio Selwart

 

Review

One of several unfinished projects Orson Welles worked on towards the end of his career has finally been completed, 33 years after the legendary director's death, thanks in large to Polish filmmaker Filip Jan Rymsza, original producer Frank Marshall and Welles' companion and one of the stars in the picture, Peter Bogdanovich. Filmed over a period of several years from 1970, the film is as infuriatingly unfocused and sketchy as it is obviously ambitious, both narratively and formally. For fans of Welles and film history, The Other Side of the Wind retains a curious significance, but mainly because of context and very little for its artistic value. Structured as a meta-film built around a film-within-a-film (the latter with a very slight and now mostly outdated parodic value), there are obvious autobiographical elements and other more or less distinct nods to various people in and around Welles' circle and the movie business in general from the time in question, all seasoned with varying amounts of humour and grudge, but mostly the latter. The dialogue and editing is indicative of being ad-libbed and jumbled together, respectively. And the end impression is more directionless than so-called "auteurish". On the positive side, the picture presents a few fascinating observations and musings on the old and new Hollywood. But it's an uninvited peek which you don't feel entitled to, not the enticing and voyeuristic peep from behind the curtain that Welles probably aimed for.

Copyright 27.11.2021 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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