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Dragged Across Concrete (2018)

Director:
S. Craig Zahler

COUNTRY
USA

Genre
Crime/Action/Thriller
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Dragged Across Concrete

RUNNING TIME
159 minutes

Producer:
Sefton Fincham
Jack Heller
Tyler Jackson
Keith Kjarval
Dallas Sonnier

Screenwriter:
S. Craig Zahler


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Brett Ridgeman Mel Gibson
Anthony Lurasetti Vince Vaughn
Henry Johns Tory Kittles
Biscuit Michael Jai White
Kelly Summer Jennifer Carpenter
Melanie Ridgeman Laurie Holden
Mr. Edmington Fred Melamed -
Friedrich Udo Kier -
Denise Tattiawna Jones -
Cheryl Justine Warrington -
Sara Ridgeman Jordyn Ashley Olson -
Rosalinda Liannet Borrego -
Ethan Johns Myles Truitt -
Jennifer Johns Vanessa Bell Calloway -
Lorentz Vogelmann Thomas Kretschmann -
Chief Lt. Calvert Don Johnson

 

Review

Anyone who saw S. Craig Zahler's directorial debut Bone Tomahawk knows what a remarkable talent he is as a filmmaker. His ability to build tension and invoke anticipation through his storytelling is unique. His talent is somewhat reminiscent of that of J. C. Chandor, although Zahler's films are more hard-hitting and pessimistic. In his latest film Dragged Across Concrete, his view on the state of affairs in modern day United States is grim, perhaps even cynical, but he argues damned well for his stance, and the film should definitely evoke reflection in everyone who watches it. The first half of the film is absolutely riveting. It's a showcase for almost everything that good movie storytelling can offer: There are complex characters and relations, there is segment upon segment which take on a life of their own and tell a separate little story, and there is that looming atmosphere which we all remember from Tomahawk. Add to that the cohesion of it all and how Zahler's script ties in and ultimately makes the sum of all its parts seem larger and more intelligent. Eventually, the crime plot comes into full play, and one could make an argument that it is not as innovative as everything else Zahler has to offer here. But there's also a poetic side to the banal hopelessness of the final predicament; as if the conclusion of it all was inevitable not for lack of ingenuity in the writing, but simply because of the nature of these characters and the society that shaped them.

Copyright 13.01.2021 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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