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Mean Streets (1973)

Director:
Martin Scorsese 
COUNTRY
USA
GENRE
Crime/Drama/Action
NORWEGIAN TITLE
Mean Streets
RUNNING TIME
110 minutes
Producer:
Jonathan T. Taplin
Screenwriter:
Martin Scorsese
Mardik Martin


Cast includes:

CHARACTER ACTOR/ACTRESS RATING
Charlie Harvey Keitel
Johnny Boy Robert De Niro
Teresa Amy Robinson
Tony David Proval
Michael Richard Romanus
Giovanni Cesare Danova
Mario Victor Argo

 

Review

Martin Scorsese draws inspiration from Jean-Luc Godard in this thematic follow-up to Who's That Knocking at My Door. We're brought back to New York's Little Italy where small time crooks and gangsters try to find a way to enjoy life - or rather get by. It is a film filled with realism, which at times is stirring, but the film's unnarrative, dense tone makes it a strenuous experience, especially as Scorsese centres the film's conflict around a no-good character whom nobody really cares for (and understandably so). Harvey Keitel's is by far the film's most interesting character, and it is through him, in the more lenient scenes, that Mean Streets comes alive in its atmospheric portrait. Scorsese shows abundances of flair and technical resourcefulness, but the film is too tapered and laborious to really attract. There is no joy in front or behind the camera, and the film is all style and little substance. Scorsese had a lot more to say with Taxi Driver three years later.

Copyright 23.9.2007 Fredrik Gunerius Fevang

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